DELIGHTFUL SATURDAYS WITH MY FAVORITE AUTHORS AND POETS (9)

PERCY BYsSHE SHELLEY

Wikipedia

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Percy Bysshe Shelley was a Great Poet belonging to the Romantic movement in the English Literature. He was born on 4 August 1792 at Field Place, Warnham, West Sussex, England. His father, Sir Timothy Shelley (1753–1844), was a Whig Member of Parliament for Horsham from 1790 to 1792 and for Shoreham between 1806 and 1812. Shelley’s mother was Elizabeth Pilfold, who was the daughter of a successful butcher.

He attended the Syon House Academy of Brentford, Middlesex, in 1802 ,with his cousin Thomas Medwin. Poor Shelley was a victim of bullying in school and sometimes reacted with a violent rage. Shelley became interested in science. His sisters were scared of him experimenting with gunpowder, acids and electricity. He happened to blow up a fence in school with his gunpowder.
He joined Eton College in 1804. He published his first novel first novel Zastrozziat the end of his last term at Eton. Shelley also finished his work Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire (written with his sister Elizabeth), the verse melodrama The Wandering Jew and the gothic novel St. Irvine; or, The Rosicrucian: A Romance (published 1811)before joining the University College of Oxford in October, 1810.
He married Mary Godwin on 30 December 1816.
His notable works are :

(1810) Zastrozzi
(1810) Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire (collaboration with Elizabeth Shelley)
(1810) Posthumous Fragments of Margaret Nicholson: Being Poems Found Amongst the Papers of That Noted Female Who Attempted the Life of the King in 1786
(1810) St. Irvyne; or, The Rosicrucian (published 1811)
(1812) The Devil’s Walk: A Ballad
(1813) Queen Mab: A Philosophical Poem
(1815) Alastor, or The Spirit of Solitude (Published 1816)
(1816) Mont Blanc
(1816) On Death
(1817) Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (text)
(1817) Laon and Cythna; or, The Revolution of the Golden City: A Vision of the Nineteenth Century (published 1818)
(1818) The Revolt of Islam, A Poem, in Twelve Cantos
(1818) Ozymandias (text)
(1818) Rosalind and Helen: A Modern Eclogue (published in 1819)
(1818) Lines Written Among the Euganean Hills, October 1818
(1819) The Cenci, A Tragedy, in Five Acts
(1819) Ode to the West Wind (text)
(1819) The Mask of Anarchy (published 1832)
(1819) England in 1819
(1819) Julian and Maddalo: A Conversation
(1820) Peter Bell the Third (published in 1839)
(1820) Prometheus Unbound, A Lyrical Drama, in Four Acts
(1820) To a Skylark
(1820) The Cloud
(1820) The Sensitive Plant
(1820) Oedipus Tyrannus; Or, Swellfoot The Tyrant: A Tragedy in Two Acts
(1820) The Witch of Atlas (published in 1824)
(1821) Adonais
(1821) Epipsychidion
(1822) Hellas, A Lyrical Drama
(1822) The Triumph of Life (unfinished, published in 1824)
Short prose works
“The Assassins, A Fragment of a Romance” (1814)
“The Coliseum, A Fragment” (1817)
“The Elysian Fields: A Lucianic Fragment” (1818)
“Una Favola (A Fable)” (1819, originally in Italian)
Essays
The Necessity of Atheism (with T. J. Hogg) (1811)

Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things (1811)
An Address, to the Irish People (1812)
Declaration of Rights (1812)
A Letter to Lord Ellenborough (1812)
A Vindication of Natural Diet (1813)
A Refutation of Deism (1814)
Speculations on Metaphysics (1814)
On the Vegetable System of Diet (1814–1815; published 1929)
On a Future State (1815)
On The Punishment of Death (1815)
Speculations on Morals (1817)
On Christianity (incomplete, 1817; published 1859)
On Love (1818)
On the Literature, the Arts and the Manners of the Athenians (1818)
On The Symposium, or Preface to The Banquet Of Plato (1818)
On Frankenstein (1818; published in 1832)
On Life (1819)
A Philosophical View of Reform (1819–20, first published 1920)
A Defence of Poetry (1821, published 1840)
Chapbooks Edit
Wolfstein; or, The Mysterious Bandit (1822)
Wolfstein, The Murderer; or, The Secrets of a Robber’s Cave (1830)
Translations
The Banquet (or The Symposium) of Plato (1818) (first published in unbowdlerised form 1931)

Ion of Plato (1821)
Collaborations with Mary Shelley
(1817) History of a Six Weeks’ Tour
(1820) Proserpine
(1820) Midas
Shelley died on 8 July 1822 (aged 29). His body was washed ashore in a badly decomposed stage.

Let’s read one of his best compositions.

Ode to the West Wind

O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being,
Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,

Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red,
Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou,
Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed

The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low,
Each like a corpse within its grave, until
Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow

Her clarion o’er the dreaming earth, and fill
(Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air)
With living hues and odors plain and hill:

Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere;
Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh, hear!

II

Thou on whose stream, ‘mid the steep sky’s commotion,
Loose clouds like earth’s decaying leaves are shed,
Shook from the tangled boughs of Heaven and Ocean,

Angels of rain and lightning: there are spread
On the blue surface of thine aery surge,
Like the bright hair uplifted from the head

Of some fierce Maenad, even from the dim verge
Of the horizon to the zenith’s height,
The locks of the approaching storm. Thou dirge

Of the dying year, to which this closing night
Will be the dome of a vast sepulchre,
Vaulted with all thy congregated might

Of vapors, from whose solid atmosphere
Black rain, and fire, and hail will burst: oh, hear!

III

Thou who didst waken from his summer dreams
The blue Mediterranean, where he lay,
Lulled by the coil of his crystalline streams,

Beside a pumice isle in Baiae’s bay,
And saw in sleep old palaces and towers
Quivering within the wave’s intenser day,

All overgrown with azure moss and flowers
So sweet, the sense faints picturing them! Thou
For whose path the Atlantic’s level powers

Cleave themselves into chasms, while far below
The sea-blooms and the oozy woods which wear
The sapless foliage of the ocean, know

Thy voice, and suddenly grow gray with fear,
And tremble and despoil themselves: oh, hear!

IV

If I were a dead leaf thou mightest bear;
If I were a swift cloud to fly with thee;
A wave to pant beneath thy power, and share

The impulse of thy strength, only less free
Than thou, O uncontrollable! If even
I were as in my boyhood, and could be

The comrade of thy wanderings over Heaven,
As then, when to outstrip thy skiey speed
Scarce seemed a vision; I would ne’er have striven

As thus with thee in prayer in my sore need.
Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud!
I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!

A

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Percy Bysshe Shelley was a Great Poet belonging to the Romantic movement in the English Literature. He was born on 4 August 1792 at Field Place, Warnham, West Sussex, England. His father, Sir Timothy Shelley (1753–1844), was a Whig Member of Parliament for Horsham from 1790 to 1792 and for Shoreham between 1806 and 1812. Shelley’s mother was Elizabeth Pilfold, who was the daughter of a successful butcher.

He attended the Syon House Academy of Brentford, Middlesex, in 1802 ,with his cousin Thomas Medwin. Poor Shelley was a victim of bullying in school and sometimes reacted with a violent rage. Shelley became interested in science. His sisters were scared of him experimenting with gunpowder, acids and electricity. He happened to blow up a fence in school with his gunpowder.
He joined Eton College in 1804. He published his first novel first novel Zastrozziat the end of his last term at Eton. Shelley also finished his work Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire (written with his sister Elizabeth), the verse melodrama The Wandering Jew and the gothic novel St. Irvine; or, The Rosicrucian: A Romance (published 1811)before joining the University College of Oxford in October, 1810.
He married Mary Godwin on 30 December 1816.
His notable works are :

(1810) Zastrozzi
(1810) Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire (collaboration with Elizabeth Shelley)
(1810) Posthumous Fragments of Margaret Nicholson: Being Poems Found Amongst the Papers of That Noted Female Who Attempted the Life of the King in 1786
(1810) St. Irvyne; or, The Rosicrucian (published 1811)
(1812) The Devil’s Walk: A Ballad
(1813) Queen Mab: A Philosophical Poem
(1815) Alastor, or The Spirit of Solitude (Published 1816)
(1816) Mont Blanc
(1816) On Death
(1817) Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (text)
(1817) Laon and Cythna; or, The Revolution of the Golden City: A Vision of the Nineteenth Century (published 1818)
(1818) The Revolt of Islam, A Poem, in Twelve Cantos
(1818) Ozymandias (text)
(1818) Rosalind and Helen: A Modern Eclogue (published in 1819)
(1818) Lines Written Among the Euganean Hills, October 1818
(1819) The Cenci, A Tragedy, in Five Acts

(1819) Ode to the West Wind (text)
(1819) The Mask of Anarchy (published 1832)
(1819) England in 1819
(1819) Julian and Maddalo: A Conversation
(1820) Peter Bell the Third (published in 1839)
(1820) Prometheus Unbound, A Lyrical Drama, in Four Acts
(1820) To a Skylark
(1820) The Cloud
(1820) The Sensitive Plant
(1820) Oedipus Tyrannus; Or, Swellfoot The Tyrant: A Tragedy in Two Acts
(1820) The Witch of Atlas (published in 1824)
(1821) Adonais
(1821) Epipsychidion
(1822) Hellas, A Lyrical Drama
(1822) The Triumph of Life (unfinished, published in 1824)
Short prose works
“The Assassins, A Fragment of a Romance” (1814)
“The Coliseum, A Fragment” (1817)
“The Elysian Fields: A Lucianic Fragment” (1818)
“Una Favola (A Fable)” (1819, originally in Italian)
Essays
The Necessity of Atheism (with T. J. Hogg) (1811)
Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things (1811)
An Address, to the Irish People (1812)
Declaration of Rights (1812)
A Letter to Lord Ellenborough (1812)
A Vindication of Natural Diet (1813)
A Refutation of Deism (1814)
Speculations on Metaphysics (1814)
On the Vegetable System of Diet (1814–1815; published 1929)
On a Future State (1815)
On The Punishment of Death (1815)
Speculations on Morals (1817)
On Christianity (incomplete, 1817; published 1859)
On Love (1818)
On the Literature, the Arts and the Manners of the Athenians (1818)
On The Symposium, or Preface to The Banquet Of Plato (1818)
On Frankenstein (1818; published in 1832)
On Life (1819)
A Philosophical View of Reform (1819–20, first published 1920)

A Defence of Poetry (1821, published 1840)
Chapbooks Edit
Wolfstein; or, The Mysterious Bandit (1822)
Wolfstein, The Murderer; or, The Secrets of a Robber’s Cave (1830)
Translations
The Banquet (or The Symposium) of Plato (1818) (first published in unbowdlerised form 1931)
Ion of Plato (1821)
Collaborations with Mary Shelley
(1817) History of a Six Weeks’ Tour
(1820) Proserpine
(1820) Midas
Shelley died on 8 July 1822 (aged 29). His body was washed ashore in a badly decomposed stage.

Ode to the West Wind

O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being,
Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,

Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red,
Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou,
Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed

The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low,
Each like a corpse within its grave, until
Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow

Her clarion o’er the dreaming earth, and fill
(Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air)
With living hues and odors plain and hill:

Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere;
Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh, hear!

II

Thou on whose stream, ‘mid the steep sky’s commotion,
Loose clouds like earth’s decaying leaves are shed,
Shook from the tangled boughs of Heaven and Ocean,

Angels of rain and lightning: there are spread
On the blue surface of thine aery surge,
Like the bright hair uplifted from the head

Of some fierce Maenad, even from the dim verge
Of the horizon to the zenith’s height,
The locks of the approaching storm. Thou dirge

Of the dying year, to which this closing night
Will be the dome of a vast sepulchre,
Vaulted with all thy congregated might

Of vapors, from whose solid atmosphere
Black rain, and fire, and hail will burst: oh, hear!

III

Thou who didst waken from his summer dreams
The blue Mediterranean, where he lay,
Lulled by the coil of his crystalline streams,

Beside a pumice isle in Baiae’s bay,
And saw in sleep old palaces and towers
Quivering within the wave’s intenser day,

All overgrown with azure moss and flowers
So sweet, the sense faints picturing them! Thou
For whose path the Atlantic’s level powers

Cleave themselves into chasms, while far below
The sea-blooms and the oozy woods which wear
The sapless foliage of the ocean, know

Thy voice, and suddenly grow gray with fear,
And tremble and despoil themselves: oh, hear!

IV

If I were a dead leaf thou mightest bear;
If I were a swift cloud to fly with thee;
A wave to pant beneath thy power, and share

The impulse of thy strength, only less free
Than thou, O uncontrollable! If even
I were as in my boyhood, and could be

The comrade of thy wanderings over Heaven,
As then, when to outstrip thy skiey speed
Scarce seemed a vision; I would ne’er have striven

As thus with thee in prayer in my sore need.
Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud!
I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!

A heavy weight of hours has chained and bowed
One too like thee: tameless, and swift, and proud.

V

Make me thy lyre, even as the forest is:
What if my leaves are falling like its own!
The tumult of thy mighty harmonies

Will take from both a deep, autumnal tone,
Sweet though in sadness. Be thou, Spirit fierce,
My spirit! Be thou me, impetuous one!

Drive my dead thoughts over the universe
Like withered leaves to quicken a new birth!
And, by the incantation of this verse,

Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth
Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!
Be through my lips to unawakened earth

The trumpet of a prophecy! O Wind,
If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?
( courtesy: mypoeticside.com)

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3 thoughts on “DELIGHTFUL SATURDAYS WITH MY FAVORITE AUTHORS AND POETS (9)

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